MacBook Pro 2016: 16 GB RAM Limit Blamed On Intel Skylake Chips

The MacBook Pro 2016 has been a disappointment for some, particularly in the area of chipset and RAM count. Apple’s Phil Schiller explains the reason behind though much of it is already out in the open.

The MacBook Pro 2016 didn’t exactly come out as the highly awaited refresh many had hoped for though the word out is that the refreshed piece is doing good in terms of sales. Apple plans to reduce prices in 2017 plus support for 32 GB of RAM but most are still a bit upset on what came out recently.

Two things make the MacBook Pro 2016 questionable – the Intel Skylake chipset and the 16 GB RAM limitation. As far as the SoC is concerned, the obvious reason is that Apple may not have had the proper stock of Intel Kaby Lake processors on their end and thus the turn to the Skylake processors instead.
As far as the 16 GB RAM is concerned, a previous post already mentioned that this was done mainly due to the effects it had on the battery the MacBook Pro 2016 had. Some didn’t buy it but Schiller provides a more detailed explanation.

Schiller singles out that a lot of it has to do with the LPDDR memory which can run up to 2133 MHz. The MacBook Pro 2016 could use 32 GB of memory but this would mean using DDR memory instead.
However, doing so would require changes in the design of the logic board that may affect the space allotted to the machine’s battery. Summing it all up, it reduces battery life if used.

The issue on consuming up more energy was already mentioned before if 32 GB of RAM were used. For those who didn’t get the logic, the reason is apparently tied up to the kind of chips to be used.
But what if 32 GB DDR4 RAM chips were used instead? While it may work, the next problem it brings is compatibility to the Intel Skylake processors, BGR reported. In essence, the issues are technical in nature as Apple places emphasis on longevity for the MacBook Pro 2016.